Wednesday, 18 January 2017 05:40

Trees available to the public

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Frequently we’re asked at Chimera Redwoods if there will be chimeric albino seedlings and cuttings available for sale. Arborist Tom Stapleton is currently working on a project that will make this a reality in the future. As of this writing he and the Holderman family have patented a chimeric albino redwood named ‘Mosaic Delight' (USPP26573) that should be available to public in 2019. The tree was developed as a result of a greenhouse experiment and was not taken from cuttings in the wild. Funds received from the sale of these trees will help offset research expenses. Tom also believes that by making these trees available to the public will help protect those in our state and national parks from being poached by souvenir hunters. If you are interested in purchasing a chimeric redwood in the future and would like to be put on our notification list, please reach out to Tom in the ‘Contact’ section of the website.


For more reading on Mosaic Delight's traits, see the write up here: New Cultivar Mosaic Delight

Holderman cross

Read 652 times Last modified on Wednesday, 18 January 2017 06:45

2 comments

  • Comment Link Homework Help Online Tuesday, 06 June 2017 07:32 posted by Homework Help Online

    The tree was produced therefore of a nursery explore and was not taken from cuttings in nature. Reserves gotten from the offer of these trees will enable balanced to research costs. They come across unearthly and on a stormy foggy day these appear much additional apparition like.

  • Comment Link Magdalena OConnor Saturday, 15 April 2017 19:37 posted by Magdalena OConnor

    Hello, I have always been interested in plants especially those that have medicinal and global impact on the environment. I have always looked upon mutations in plants as not as a freak of nature, but as an intended ecological act of Mother Nature. Here in North Carolina and in South Carolina there are numerous trees that are covered with what the locals call " parasitic moss ". They look like ghost airy plants hanging on the trees. They look ethereal and on a rainy foggy day these look even more ghostlike. I may be so bold as to presume that this is another of Mother Earth's ecological act of preservation for the many species of trees growing here and this also helps all of us by removing pollutants in the air. I would like to be on your list for a chimera redwood seedling in 2019. I do not know if it will survive here in Wilmington, NC, but I sure would like to try. My home address will be 518 Larchmont Drive, Wilmington, NC 28403 by May, 2017. Thank you very much. Keep up the good work. Magdalena O'Connor

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