Friday, 28 July 2017 12:32

The Reno Coast Redwood

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Monday, 02 September 2019 10:09

Green Redwood Mutations & Other Strange Oddities

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In addition to albino redwood studies, there are numerous green mutations and other unusual growth forms within Coast Redwoods that are noteworthy and deserving of further research. The trees within this category are truly unique and a testament to the species plasticity to adapt in new forms. Like albino albino chimeras, some of these mutations listed below are so incredibly rare that only one tree example is known to exist. With the 2019 Save The Redwoods League Redwood Genome Project complete, hopefully scientists will be able to determine what causes these unusual mutations to exist and why. Below is a list of some of the strange and exceptional:

Thursday, 22 January 2015 16:41

Chimera Redwoods - Gems of the Forest

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Perhaps the most beautiful and fascinating of all redwood mutations is the Chimera Albino Redwood. What’s unique about chimeras is they consist of organized cells that have two visually distinguishable sets of DNA (genotypes) within the same plant. Genetically speaking, chimeras are essentially two trees in one. Caused by an extremely rare mutation within the meristematic cells of redwood buds, chimeras exhibit sectors of green & white foliage together in an array of very distinct patterns. Unlike their Nonchimeric Variegated Albino Redwood cousins, Chimeras display clear lines of delineation between the borders of each genotype. What’s interesting about chimeras that sets them apart from other mutations is they come in three different phenotypic subsets or color patterns know as: sectorial, mericlinal, & periclinal.

Not only noted for their beauty, Chimeras have been responsible for giving researchers the latest discoveries in redwood morphology. Because of the organized color differences between the cells of chimeric redwoods, scientists have been able to visually understand how redwood meristematic cell layers grow and interact with each other which previously hasn’t been understood within normal green redwoods. This research has allowed for a better interpretation of how redwoods develop and why we see such genetic variation within this species. 

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